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Fall 2020 Recipients:

Chloe Hamer

Chloe Hamer is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill. Her research centers around questions of collective memory, class, and political resistance in postcolonial Caribbean literatures, with a specific focus on the relationship between anti-global capitalist activism and literary form. Chloe’s dissertation aims to explore depictions of labor in contemporary Haitian and Haitian diasporic novels, examining the ways in which these novels make use of opaque narrative techniques to critique networks of neocolonial commodity production and consumption. Chloe has taught courses in the French and English departments at UNC; she has also been the recipient of a Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowship for the study of Haitian Kreyòl.

As a comparativist, Chloe is excited to be joining the LSP, where she is currently organizing an undergraduate research symposium for the Spring 2021 semester.

Jo Klevdal

Jo Klevdal Headshot

Jo Klevdal is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literatures where she studies 20th century literature. Her primary interests relate to various understandings of memory and their relationship to both language and image. For her current work, she examines the intersection of photography and literature in the early 20th century. Jo is originally from Colorado and holds a M.A. from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Click here to check out Jo’s Writing in the Social Sciences Unit Assignment, focused on Latina/o Immigration.

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez Headshot

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez is a first-generation migrant and a PhD. student—in that order—through the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill. As both poet and scholar, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry. Focusing on 20th-century experimental poetry, their dissertation (tentatively titled Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric) probes a shared subterranean literary and philosophical history in the Américas through the lens of Neobaroque aesthetics, tracing dissonant and dissident relations in the life and work of figures such as Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Néstor Perlongher, and Cecilia Vicuña. emilio’s first book of poetry, landskips (words are a hard look), a latinX reconnaissance of the sonics and optics of our contemporary USAmerican physical and imaginative landscapes, is forthcoming through The Concern Newsstand.

Click here to check out emilio’s Writing in the Social Sciences Unit Assignment, focused on songs affiliated with social movements.

Nikki Roulo

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Nikki Roulo is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics.

Click here to check out Nikki’s Writing in the Social Sciences Unit Assignment, focused on Latina/o cultural practices.

Leslie Rowen

Leslie Rowen Headshot

Leslie Rowen is a third year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. There, she focuses on 20th Century American Literature of War, especially soldier writings composed during wartime. In 2017, she received her B.A. in English and Spanish from Bellarmine University in Louisville, KY. During her time at Bellarmine, she studied for a semester at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito in Quito, Ecuador, where she took classes in Spanish and Ecuador’s history. Between her time at USFQ and Bellarmine, she also took several classes on Latin film, which will be the focus of her English 105 Humanities Unit. Some of her favorites are Pablo Larraín’s No and Tania Hermida’s Qué Tan Lejos. She is eager to share these films with her students, hear their perspectives, and help them create dynamic visual essays using Adobe Spark.

Click here to check out Leslie’s Writing in the Humanities Unit Assignment, focused on Latinx Film.

Krysten Voelkner

Krysten Voelkner Headshot

My primary interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary LatinX literature. Topics which I find exciting relate to the rhetoric of environmental advocacy, the myriad of emotional responses to the threat of climate change, and the ways in which LatinX writers and artists create environmental epistemologies through their works. Outside of the academy, I enjoy nurturing all forms of human and other life; I am an avid houseplant collector, a stepmother to three girls, and have three dogs whom I love very much.

Click here to check out Krysten’s Writing in the Humanities Unit Assignment, focused on Latinx Detective Fiction.

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