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Spring 2023 Courses

AAAD 89: First Year Seminar: Afro-Latinxs in the U.S.

Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45AM

Dr. Maya Berry

What does it mean to be both racially Black and ethnically Latino in the U.S.? This course will look at the history, culture, experiences, political struggles, and social dilemmas of “Afro-Latinos”: African-descended peoples from Latin America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean who reside in the U.S. The erasure of these communities, along with their struggles for well-being, prosperity, belonging, and visibility, will be explored. This course provides an opportunity for a deeper understanding of the legacies of the transatlantic slave trade, ethno-nationalism, and U.S. foreign-policy, and their connection to contemporary issues of migration, inequality, and anti-blackness. In-depth conversations about the politics of “race” and “ethnicity” will trouble dominant U.S. paradigms of identity. In this discussion-oriented class, we will engage with a variety of sources, from academic books and scholarly articles to film. Students will synthesize their understanding through daily forum posts, a collaboratively-prepared presentation, an essay, and a group research project.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Global Understanding and Engagement
  • Power, Difference, and Inequality

ANTH 450 Ethnographic Research Methods

Tuesdays, 12:30-3:00PM in AL 205

Dr. Angela Stuesse | astuesse@unc.edu

LTNO Minors can take the course for LTNO credit by designing a Latinx-focused research project.
This course is currently listed as ANTH 490 but will change to ANTH 450 before spring semester. The anthropology department will still count it as an ANTH 490 (a requirement for anthropology majors and minors).

This course offers an opportunity for students to learn about the methodologies of ethnographic research and put these into practice through a semester-long field research project in the Triangle. Though this project, we explore the theoretical, ethical, and practical promises and challenges of ethnography, from problem definition, research design, and entering the field to data analysis, validity, and “writing up.” Along the way we focus on the collection and analysis of ethnographic data using participant observation, fieldnotes, interviewing, life histories, visual methods, focus groups, archival and ethnographic survey research, and various strategies for organizing and coding data. Each week’s readings teach us about (a) new research method(s), which we discuss in class and then implement in our projects through weekly structured ethnographic assignments. Class meetings are used largely as workshops to discuss what we are learning and provide / receive feedback (both instructor and peer-to-peer) on our ongoing projects. Students’ work over the semester culminates in an in-class presentation of their ethnographic research, as well as a final ethnographic report.

DRAM 488 Section 001 U.S. Latino/a/e Theatre & Performance

Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45AM

Dr. Adam Versényi

Fulfills the Aesthetic and Interpretative Analysis Focus and the Power, Difference, and Inequality Focus Capacities.

This course investigates U.S. Latino/a/é theatre texts and performance practices as a discreet genre within the larger context of theatre in the United States. Students will study what distinguishes U.S. Latino/a/é theatre from the larger dominant (European American) culture, as well as the diversity of forms, styles, and theatrical practices present within U.S. Latino/a/é theatre itself.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Power, Difference, and Inequality
  • Communication Intensive (Making Connections)
  • Aesthetics and Interpretive Analysis

ENGL 164: Introduction to Latinx Studies

Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45AM

Dr. Ylce Irizarry

This course introduces the concerns, methodology, and aesthetics of Latina/o/x Studies. We will explore cultural productions exploring and portraying the complex reality of ‘being’ Latinx. Students will learn about Latinidad in relation to historic, social, aesthetic, and legal systems of representation. Special focus will be given to four broad topics: immigration, urban experience, gender construction, and ecocriticism (yes, we will discuss zombies!). Authors/Identities/Cultures explored center the Caribbean Basin; we will focus on Afro Diasporic cultures including Cuban, Dominican, Haitian, Puerto Rican & Central American cultures. Beyond these broader geographical designations, particular attention will be placed on Ecuadorian, Mexican, & Salvadoran cultural production. Reading includes poems, stories, & novels. Viewing includes films, visual and performance art, & music video. We will explore Latinx cultural production on its own aesthetic terms, as texts revising history, visualizing stories, and advancing social justice. Individual assignments will include Short Writing Assignments & Unit Exams; Group projects will include Discussion Leads and/or a Digital Project. All instruction and graded assignments will be in English; students are welcome to read materials in Spanish/translation if they prefer.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Power, Difference, and Inequality
  • Aesthetics and Interpretive Analysis

ENGL 390: Studies in Literary Topics: “Misbehaving Bodies: Dis/ease, Dis/order, & Dys/topia in Latinx Fiction and Film”

Tues/Thurs 12:30-1:45PM

Dr. Ylce Irizarry

This course explores how post-1992 Latinx fiction & film portray “misbehaving” bodies. We will study how bodies that do not conform to desired “norms” are treated. These “misbehaving” bodies include the following: human and other-than-human, diseased, dissident, queer, transgender, migrant, refugee, dead, and half-dead. Students will learn how misbehaving bodies have been and are currently portrayed in relation to historic, social, aesthetic, and legal systems of representation. ¡There will be plagues, zombies, killer anemones, and space travel in the science fiction, speculative fiction, and ghost noir we read! Ultimately, we aim to develop understandings of the problems and possibilities for misbehaving bodies. Authors/Filmmakers will have Chicanx, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Guatemalan ethnonational origins, and emphasis will be placed on Afro Latinx/ Afro Diasporic narrative. Materials include novellas, novels, short stories, and films. Assignments will include Short Writing Assignments; a Digital Project; Unit Exams; a Paper. All instruction and graded assignments will be in English; students are welcome to read materials in Spanish/translation if they prefer.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Aesthetics and Interpretive Analysis

ENGL. 687 Queer LatinX Environmentalisms

Thursdays 3:00 – 6:00 PM

Dr. María DeGuzmán

Fulfills the AESTHETICS focus and the POWER focus. Any questions, email: deguzman@email.unc.edu

This mixed level graduate and advanced undergraduate course examines queer LatinX literature from the 1990s to the present as it intersects with ecological and environmentalist concerns. LatinX literature is multi-ethno-racial and, even when emerging from the United Sates, is multi-national in terms of dovetailing with other national heritage cultures. We explore how these cultural productions question normative assumptions about the “order of things,” the “naturalness” of nature, and the “inevitability” of the historical exploitations of coloniality and the ongoing predations of neocolonialism. We pay close attention to LatinX cultural productions that approach cosmology, ecology, and environmental justice from queer perspectives and that queer ecological concerns from minoritized perspectives.“Queer” and “LatinX” combined with one another and modifying “Environmentalisms” signal other ways of thinking, doing, being, and becoming. These other ways entail exploring concepts of “nature” entangled with and dis-entangled from the coercive essentialisms of “natural law” and the violent settler-colonialism informing patriarchal capitalist “normalcy”; thinking beyond the blinders of heteronormative and species-hierarchical traditional humanism; perceiving and valuing multiple forms of kinship between humans and between humans and other life forms; ceasing to measure worth by a compulsory procreational model; conceiving sustainable interdependencies and thriving assemblages; and cultivating the diversity of diversity as part of salvaging what remains of biodiversity in this time of human-induced global and planetary crisis. With every text, film, and other cultural production, we will be exploring its aesthetic dimensions (hence FC-AESTH) in relation to its socio-political dimensions (FC-POWER). Assignments: two 8-page essays totaling at least 16 pages for undergraduates (for graduate students the second essay is 22–25 pages long), active class participation, and final exam. The grade percentage distribution is as follows: essay 1 (30%), essay 2 (40%), final exam (20%), and class participation that includes individual and collaborative oral presentations(10%). 

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Power, Difference, and Inequality
  • Aesthetics and Interpretive Analysis

LTAM 390-002: Heritage and Migration in North Carolina

Tues/Thurs 11:00AM – 12:15PM

Dr. Hannah Gill

Register for Latin American Studies 390-002 to learn about Heritage and Migration in North Carolina. This APPLES Service Learning course will train students to use oral history to understand the immigration and settlement of North Carolinians with Latin American ancestry.

Some aspects of this course require communicating in Spanish, so it is recommended that students have intermediate-advanced levels of Spanish language proficiency. Students will spend spring break participating in oral history research and service learning in Eastern North Carolina.

Contact Professor Hannah Gill at hgill.unc.edu with any questions.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Global Understanding
  • Research and Discovery

MUSC 147 Music of the Americas

Tues/Thurs 9:30-10:45AM in room 2131 of the Kenan Music Building

Dr. Juan Álamo

An introduction to contemporary Latin(o) American popular music, focusing on how musicians have negotiated an increasingly global popular culture industry. Class Notes: Some seats are reserved through a reserve capacity in this section for first year and transfer students. Instruction Mode: in person on campus learners.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Power, Difference, and Inequality

WGST 233. Introduction to Latina Literature. 3 Credits.

Tues/Thurs 3:30 – 4:45PM

Dr. Ariana Vigil

This course will provide an introduction to Latina literature. We will read a variety of genres from a range of ethno-national perspectives and examine such topics as immigration, identity, mother-daughter relationships, and sexuality.

This course fulfills the following General Education Objectives:

  • Power, Difference, and Inequality
  • Aesthetics and Interpretive Analysis
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